ART | Sorting out an heirloom by Arthur Parton

PartonThis oil by Arthur Parton has been in my mother’s family for 80 years or so.

Though they aren’t serious about it any way, shape or form, my parents have amassed a nice little collection of art that includes watercolors, oils, sculpture, pastels and prints — none all that expensive or valuable.

Since my maternal grandfather’s death in 1984, a nice little oil has hung in the front hall of my parents’ house. He’d inherited the painting from some distant cousins in the late 1920s or early 1930s and my mother, his only daughter, kept it after she broke up his house. We’ve never given it much notice. Earlier this summer, spurred by the appearance of a Jasper Cropsey painting on “Antiques Roadshow,” I decided to check our painting out.

Before I share the results of my query, let me also say that my parents are also avid Hudson River School fans who’ve probably been to every major art museum in this country. For my own part, there are days when I wish I’d pursued a career as an art historian — my St. Lawrence thesis explored Frederic Remington’s various depictions of Canada.

It turns out our little oil was painted by Arthur Parton in 1872. Parton, born in Hudson, N.Y. in 1842, was a member of the Hudson River School. Here’s a biography, courtesy of the Pierce Galleries:

Arthur Parton was born in Hudson, N.Y. and along with his brothers Ernets (1845-1933) and Henry (1858-1933), he wanted to become a painter from an early age. Arthur Parton became a prominent 19th century landscape painter after studying with William Trost Richards in Philadelphia and at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and after a trip to Europe where he was highly influenced by the Barbizon painters (1869). In 1872, his view of the Shenandoah River (Virginia) was published in Bryant’s Picturesque America and that publication gave him instantaneous recognition.

During the reign of the Hudson River School Parton became an Associate of the National Academy of Design (1871) and a full National Academician (1884). He was a leading member of the American Water Color Society and the Artist’s Fund Society. He exhibited at the National Academy (1862-1914), winning a prize at the NAD in 1896; the Corcoran Gallery, Washington, DC (1907, 1908, 1910); Brooklyn Art Association (1866-1885); Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, 1876; Boston Art Club (1882-1909) and more. Awards include one in New York City (gold, 1886); Temple Gold Medal at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (1889); a medal at the St. Louis Exposition (1904) and more. His work is represented in the Brooklyn Institute Museum; the Indianapolis Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, NYC.

Parton painted throughout New York state and is known for his paintings of the Catskill and Adirondack mountains. He was a well-known artist and well-liked, having exhibited for over a half-century at the National Academy, and moving from a tight academic Hudson River School palette into Impressionism.

From 1874-1893, he maintained a Tenth Street Studio at 51 West 10th Street, alongside William Merritt Chase in New York City, and he probably was highly influenced by Chase’s impressionistic canvases of Shinnecock.

We’re in the process of having the piece appraised. Stay tuned!

FRONT PAGES | The Royal Wedding

Times_lead
The cover of today’s edition of The Times.

So, as you might have heard, there was a little wedding at Westminster Abbey Friday. Prince William of Wales, newly styled as the Duchess of Cambridge, took Catherine Middleton, a commoner, as his wife.

Here’s a little selection of how today’s newspapers played the story-book wedding:

SAILING | Braving the sound in wintry weather

sailing gear
Gear you’ll want should you be brave enough to undertake winter sailing, as our newest correspondent, Edward Briganti, has.

Edward Briganti
ejforbes.com Contributing Writer

If you’re a New Yorker (or live anywhere on the eastern seaboard for that matter), you know we’re coming off what’s proved to have been a long winter. As a lifelong sailor, however, I long ago swore off heading out on the water between October and late April unless it was in warmer climes. But after New York’s fourth major snowstorm, I was driven from my cramped, stuffy, over-heated apartment into the outdoors. I have begun “Frostbiting,” as winter sailing in New England is known, on Sundays at Larchmont Yacht Club. It’s amazing how “up” life can look just by spending a few hours in the sun, even if it’s 40 degrees.

On the other side, winter sailing can be a brutally cold and miserable affair — the water is a hypothermic 36 degrees — so cold the floor of the cockpit gets chilly and forms ice inside the boat as you sail; there is more wind and it is shiftier and puffier and more unpredictable than in the summertime — all increasing the dreaded threat of a capsize. The fear of capsizing, however, is what also makes winter sailing so exciting. It’s healthy for the soul to scare the crap out of yourself every now and again. Winter sailing can also be some of the most strategically rewarding and visually appealing sailing there is. The light refracts off the water in a crisper, clearer way and the lack of boat traffic creates smooth waters. When it’s good, there’s often nothing better, so it is critical that outdoor sportsman dress appropriately for the conditions. Below is a summary of the gear I use, love, and recommend. All are based on two key and reinforcing themes: warmth and moisture transfer.

My take on gear is that you pretty much get what you pay for and cheap can be expensive. I take a long-term investment approach to my gear: if you buy the good stuff, it will perform better, longer. While it is recommended that anybody recreating in waters colder than 50 degrees wear a drysuit, it is not mandatory. For the sake of comfort, I use my Gore-Tex and capilene based offshore foul weather gear as my winter sailing attire.

1. Top: Musto MPX Gore-Text Race Smock: My top layer has an active cut, room for layering, articulated elbows and underarms for ease of movement. I like the smooth non-abrasive stretch neck seals with Velcro adjustment, side opening neck with waterproof gusset, and Velcro adjustable neoprene waistband. Side pockets with water resistant zips stash granola bars or a beanie on warm days. The waterproof coating keeps me dry.

2. Bottoms: Musto MPX Offshore Trousers: I lived in these bibs for 4 sultry days in the Gulf Stream on the way to Bermuda during the 2008 Newport Bermuda Race. The 500 denier Cordura seat & knee patches resist abrasion while hiking and moving around the cockpit. There’s plenty of room for layering. The multi-tool sheath stores my Gerber multi-tool. My favorite feature is the 2-way zip, which allows one to relieve oneself over the side without having to derobe.

3. Boots: Shamrock Stretch Boot by Dubarry of Ireland: Cozy feet are happy feet and happy feet make for a good sailor. These boots are gore-tex lined and incredibly comfortable. There’s enough room to fit a Little Hotties toe warmer inside as well. Some people think it’s cool to
wear these boots around town. Don’t. These boots will save your life, so treat those award-winning slip resistant soles with respect and have a pair of sneakers to change into when you’re
back on the dock before you reach the pavement.

4. Lifejacket: Lotus Designs PFD: This was my lifejacket from college sailing. I picked it up on a five-finger discount from the Lost & Found at the yacht club after watching it go unclaimed for an entire summer. The low profile/flak-jacket look is key to keep the things flow. The utility pocket on the front carries your knife, lip balm, granola bar, and beer koozie.

5. Gloves: Atlas Thermal Fit gardening gloves: Yes gardening gloves. Sold individually and preferred by sailors who always seem to lose just one glove. Much cheaper than brand-name sailing-specific gloves, just as warm, and in many cases more functional.

6. Sunglasses: Haber Vision Kenais: A bunch of ex Bollé guys got together and produced a gnarly line of polarized shades at value prices. The full coverage blocks out glare, and the polarized rose-colored lenses allow you to spot that lefty shift coming down the course from 300 yards
away.

7. Hat: Patagonia Beanie: Crews might prefer a thicker wool hat, but as a skipper, I often get warm when I’m in the thick of racing.

8. Fleece Sweater: Patagonia R2 Jacket: This piece will essentially be your mid-layer between your smock and you base underwear. It is super light, super compressible, breathable, and heck, the U.S. Marines even use this jacket (have yet to find the special issue tan and olive drab), it must be good! The softly lined inner collar is where it’s at.

9. Fleece Pants: Patagonia R1 Pant: Similar to the R2 jacket but for your legs. Could get a little warm on the more mild days, if so, drop down to full-length capilene tights.

10. Wicking Undershirt: Patagonia Capilene: No cotton t-shirts in here. We wick and we stay warm and dry. Not much more to say here.

11. Wicking Underwear: Patagonia Active Boxers: The outdoor sportsman can’t have enough pairs of this wicking boxer short.

12. Socks: Patagonia Mid-weight Hiking Socks: If it seems like I’m obsessed with Patagonia, I am. They make good stuff and I believe that pretty much all others are just imitations. In all practicality though, you need a warm sock for frostbiting but it’s important that your sock not be a thick one. In the event you end up in the water and your boots fill up, you need to be able to kick them off easily. While this is an extreme situation, in reality, the Dubarry’s seem to fit better with a thinner sock.

13. Multi-tool: Gerber: The icon on this tool is a sword in a stone. I’ve had this tool since high, school and it has truly been my Excalibur. The quick deploy needle-nose pliers are a big help in clasping cold ring dings and adjusting shroud tension.

14. Knife: Boye Boatknife: A multi-tool AND a knife you say? What for? Well, the Gerber is your toolbox in a sheath for all the nuts, bolts, ring dings, pins, and other misc. hardware on the boat that might require attention. Yes the Gerber has a blade, but every sailor worth his salt knows a knife is really for personal safety. When things get rough and that line needs to be cut to free yourself or your crew from danger, you need a blade that will deploy quickly, cut inch-thick line like butter, and it’s dendritic cobalt so it won’t rust in the saltwater environment. For that you choose Boye.

15. Activated Warmers: Little Hotties:
It might seem like cheating with all this gear to use these little suckers but when it’s cold out, you’ll be glad to have them. Who said you have to suffer and be uncomfortable?! Enjoy some creature comforts and stuff yourself (especially crews) with these activated charcoal warmers.

16. Neck gaiter: Buff Original: Some people like the fleece ski neck gaiter, I prefer the lower profile, climate controlled Buff. The fish scale pattern lets the competition know I’m serious.

SKIING | Gone skijoring outside Saranac Lake

SkijoringYour writer and his hound, Kennedy, give skijoring a go a few miles from Saranac Lake on Sunday morning.

It’s something I’ve always wanted to do. And in all the years I lived in the Adirondacks, I never gave it a go.

Skijoring, in which a nordic skier is pulled by a dog or horse, is not something I ever thought my hound, Kennedy, could handle. While he is a very fast runner, he’s led by his nose and he only weighs 35 pounds. But on Sunday, during a visit to Camp Mary, aka Mount Van Hann, a property outside Saranac Lake owned by our dear friends Molly and Steve Hann, we gave it a try.

Ken was up for the challenge.

Despite initially trying to play with Lola, the Hann’s English Setter, he eventually got the concept, if not the practice. That nose distracted him quite a few times. He was, after all, at home in his native Adirondacks and he loves to dive into deep snow piles.

By the time Steve yielded the harness to me, though, Ken had basically hit a stride, albeit a slow one as he was tiring out — 45 minutes of dashing around with a snowshoed Mrs. F. diminished his strength.

As you can see in the gallery below, the Hanns have developed a nice little network of loops. Steve, ever the man for a project, has purchased a 1979 SkiDoo Alpine and built a groomer. They’ve got a kilometer and a half of trail in total, all cleared and well marked.

Take a look:

WHEELS | 1950 Crosley Hotshot roadster

CrosleyHotshotFormer New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller’s 1950 Crosley Hotshot roadster, left, on display in the Coach Barn at Kykuit.

Last fall, as I wrote here, Mrs. F. and I spent a very nice afternoon at Kykuit, the Rockefeller estate in Sleepy Hollow. Among the many treasures there are Gov. Nelson Rockefeller’s extensive car collection. Displayed alongside the massive midcentury behemoths the governor used while in office is a 1950 Crosley Hotshot roadster.

The car, a charmingly-designed convertible that looks more like a dune-buggy than anything else, was first introduced in 1949. Rockefeller’s is a 1950 model. Time magazine has called the 1,100-pound, 149-inch car one of the worst cars of all time, writing:

What killed the Hotshot was its engine, a dual-overhead cam .75-liter four cylinder, not cast in iron but brazed together from pieces of stamped tin. When these brazed welds let go, as they often did, things quickly got noisy, and hot.

The Hotshot was manufactured until Crosley Motors ceased to be in 1952. The company had been founded in 1939 by Cincinnati industrialist Powel Crosley, who made his fortune manufacturing radios and owned the Cincinnati Reds. With the help of his brother, Lewis, he launched Crosley Motors in 1939. The cars enjoyed some popularity during World War II as they were relatively fuel efficient. After the war’s end, the line expanded to include sedans, wagons, coupes and roadsters. At its peak, in 1948, the company sold nearly 25,000 vehicles manufactured at two plants in Indiana and one in Ohio.

Crosley owners included Omar Bradley, Humphrey Bogart, Pamela Harriman, Gloria Swanson, Frank Lloyd Wright and Rockefeller.

STYLE | Chipp, Fall 1965

ChippFall1965A selection of outerwear from Chipp’s Fall 1965 catalog.

Just before the holidays, I snatched up a copy of Chipp’s 1965 fall catalog.

The venerable tailor, which survives today as Chipp 2/Winston Tailors, occupied a building between Madison and Fifth on 44th Street in 1965. As you can see below, the space had been renovated that year and departments had been expanded. Sidney Winston founded Chipp in 1947 after starting his career with J. Press. His son, Paul, joined the firm in 1961 and carries on today. Paul was the subject of a charming Times story in May 2008 and gave an excellent interview to Ivy Style in April 2009. You’ll also want to give this 1980s catalog, available over at Prepidemic Magazine, a gander.

At its peak, Chipp employed 30 tailors and a sales staff of 10. The Kennedys were among its customers. Today, as Paul noted in a blog post earlier this month, Chipp 2/Winston Tailors is in search of a new home as its midtown lease was not renewed.

But back to 1965.

Naturally, these pages prompt a good deal of nostalgia — not simply for much better prices ($18 for tassel loafers!) but also for elements of style that have faded away. The hat, which most believe died with the advent of the Kennedy administration, appears alive in the Chipp world of 1965. There’s lots to chew on here, so I hope you enjoy. These pages display fairly well in the gallery, but if you’d like to dowload full-sized versions, visit the Flickr set I’ve created.

GALLERY | 50 years after: The Kennedy inauguration

President John F. Kennedy delivers his inaugural address.

President John F. Kennedy delivers his inaugural address.

Fifty years ago today, John F. Kennedy, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts who won the White House by the smallest popular-vote margin in history, was inaugurated as the 35th president of the United States.

The event, which included a reading from memory of “The Gift Outright” by Robert Frost and a delivery of the Star-Spangled Banner by Marian Anderson, is perhaps the best-remembered inauguration in American history. Kennedy’s 14-minute speech, in which he charged Americans to answer their nation’s call to service, sits near the top of a list of spectacular American orations. Kennedy said:

… Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and the success of liberty. …

As Todd S. Purdum writes in Vanity Fair this month, the day sent a “tidal wave of glamour, promise, and high spirits” across Washington and the nation. No inauguration, before or since, could be argued to be as glamorous or filled with optimism as Kennedy’s.

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum has assembled a terrific website that gathers together materials related to the dawn of the Thousand Days. And, to boot, they’ve digitized the bulk of their Kennedy Administration archive.

Here’s a collection of LIFE photos from the inauguration:

BULLETIN | Buffalo’s Pitt Petri to close Jan. 28

Pitt PetriThe logo of Pitt Petri, a Buffalo institution that is set to close Jan. 28

Sad news from the Queen City this morning: Pitt Petri, the venerable Delaware Avenue emporium will close its doors on Jan. 28 after a poor holiday shopping season, The Buffalo News reports.

The store, founded in 1924, offers the best in home goods and has been housed registries for Buffalo brides for as long as anyone can remember. Among the store’s signature items is a chip-and-dip engraved with a running Buffalo. We’ve given these as wedding gifts over the years, substituting the Buffalo for monograms. Among the other wonderful things the store offers are Leonore Doskow silver (Mrs. F. gave me a monogrammed belt buckle as a 27th birthday present), beautiful magazine racks and dishes engraved with wedding invitations.

Pitt Petri’s fortunes have been lagging for several years. The Williamsville outlet closed in 2009 and late last year, the Petri family announced plans to reduce the size of the Delaware Avenue location. Those plans changed after the holidays. Merchandise is on offer for 50 percent off through the closing.

Buffalo women across the land will shed tears in their wine tonight.

GIFTS | The ejforbes.com 2010 holiday list

KnotbeltA beer-themed belt from Knot Belt Co. is among the items in 2010 ejforbes.com holiday gift list.

The holidays — ready or not! — are knocking. It’s time to get shopping. Here’s our second annual selection for just about anyone on your list. This was assembled with the help of contributing writers Will Briganti and Maxwell Eaton III. It’s a bit on the masculine side, but you’ll cope.

Happy shopping.

GreenBlazerDuds and headwear
Bottle-green blazer: The navy blazer, definitely a wardrobe staple, can be complicated by the rarer bottle-green version. For outfitting, we turn to O’Connell, Lucas and Chelf, Buffalo’s iconic men’s store. Their three-button sack model fits the bill. Made in the United States.From $350.

Tab t-shirt: A campus classic for decades that takes its cues from crew teams of yore, this is an essential piece of casual clothing. Naturally, we’ve selected the St. Lawrence model, on offer from the Brewer Bookstore. $16.95.

NewarkBearshatEbbetts Field Flannels ballcaps: Made in the United States — a strong compliment — these flannel ballcaps are a must have, especially as winter starts to show its frosty face. Given our New Jersey roots, we recommend the Newark Bears model. $35.

DaleDale sweater: No clothing item we can think of quite says winter like a Dale of Norway Sweater. De rigeur in all alpine precincts, we’ve selected the U.S. Ski Team issue in honor of Lake Placid’s Andrew Weibrecht, who a bronze in Vancouver. $295 from NorwaySports.com.

Jytte hat: Nordic skiing requires the right gear. We’ve always liked the Jytte (pronounced you-tay) hats procured by the St. Lawrence ski team some years ago, and the Idaho-based firm will set you straight when it comes to headwear. Hand-made in the United States. From $18.

Filson shelter-cloth cap: Lined with wool, this cap comes recommended by ejforbes.com outdoor correspondent Steve Reynolds, a long-time Filson devotee. The water-resistant outer lining sets this cap apart. As appropriate for bird shooting as its for cruises through the urban jungle. Made in the United States. $62.50.

Brooks Brothers dress shirts: That these have been selected will probably not be seen as a surprise or a unique choice by some. It had to be done. Made in the United States — North Carolina, we’re fairly sure — these are essentials. Ed bought three earlier this year and has been suitably impressed to include them here, despite being generally skeptical of the Brothers. You won’t go wrong with the original. $89.50 or three for $199.

Eyewear
REGlassesRandolph Engineering Ranger Classics: Everyone needs good eyewear for sporting-clay excursions. Randolph Engineering delivers with its Ranger Classics, which can be customized with a range of lenses. From $119.95.

Ray-Ban Caravans: For your everyday sunglass needs, nothing beats the Ray-Ban Caravan. Nothing.Modeled on aviator frames that are still standard in most branches of the U.S. Military, these are Ed’s favorite sunglasses barring his grandfather’s Bausch and Lobs. And, for the benefit of our “Mad Men” fans, if they’re good enough for Don Draper, they damn well ought to be good enough for you. $125 from J. Crew.

Outerwear
Patagonia vest: Ed’s never recovered from the loss of his Morristown-Beard ski team vest, which was left by a friend at a Canton watering hole. He took solace for most of college in borrowing Furnary’s instead. A must-have layer. $149.

LiddesdaleShooting vest: We chose Barbour’s very fine model because it offers padding on both shoulders and because we doubt it’ll ever wear out completely. $199 from Orvis.

Barbour Liddesdale: The gold standard for a smart, country-styled coat for the winter. As common on the streets of Manhattan as its Beaufort and Bedale cousins, the Liddesdale is an affordable and stylish alternative. It’s also pretty cozy, which we’ll take. $149 at Orvis.

Henri Lloyd’s Breeze Performance Jacket: Contributing ejforbes.com writer Will Briganti writes, “This is my best purchase of 2010 this far.” An avid sailor, Briganti’s word is bond on this choice. Versatile for coastal and urban activities. $69.

Footwear
MinnetonkaMocsMinnetonka Driving Moccasin: In Dark Brown – perfect for the ski lodge or casual Fridays at the office. Invest in only one pair, the more worn in, the better. $56.95 from Holly Woodworking of Old Forge, N.Y.

Justin Ropers: As appropriate for a day on the farm as they are in any situation where dress shoes aren’t required. The basic cowboy boot from Justin is a staple we can’t deny. From $99.

Bean boot: More than one pair (one being the shorter moc-version) is essential to make it through the mud, rain and snow. We like the new, shearling-lined model. Made in Maine as always. From $149.

Vasque Sundowners: Essential for any long trips in the woods. $170.

Accessories and housewares
GouchoBeltArgentinian polo belt: One snappily dressed reader is never without his. These are downright swell and are apparently standard on the polo fields of Argentina. In regimental and school colors from Gaucho Belts. $51.

Nantucket red socks: The genuine article, only for your feet. From Murray’s, the Island’s primary haberdashery. $17.50.

Billykirk and ACL & Co. canvas briefcase: A collaboration between A Continuous Lean.’s Michael Williams and Billykirk, this olive-drab canvas case is based on a World War II bag issued by the U.S. Navy. Made in the United States. $325.

Vice holster: This Etsy item caught my eye a few weeks ago. A holster that will hold a flask, a phone or a pack of smokes, it’s the perfect hideaway for your vices be they booze, texting or tobacco. On offer from Four Chamber Forge. $95.

Smathers and Branson flaskNeedlepoint flask: Rare is the time when a tipple isn’t welcome. Indulge in style with this needlepoint-covered numbers from Smathers and Branson. Customizable with monograms, too. From $65.

Cordial Churchman velvet bow tie: We picked the rust-colored option from the Cordial Churchman, the charming bow tie emporium run by Ellie LaVeer Stager. Made of 100-percent cotton velveteen, the tie is presented in the traditional butterfly pattern. Charming. $26.

Knot beer belt: Knot Belt Co.’s belts are simply charming and this fall’s beer-bottle is now exception to that rule. Made in the U.S.A. by a Laurentian, Nick Mannella. $55.

J. Press braces: When it comes to dressing somewhat professionally, do a little growing up and embrace braces. J. Press has a versatile offering from which to choose. Keep it conservative. $59.25.

Housewares and other gear
Chip and dip: One of Mrs. F.’s favorite pieces of serving wear is a glass chip-and-dip engraved with a Buffalo. It comes from Pitt Petri the venerable purveyor of all things proper in Buffalo, N.Y. These also come monogrammed. From $84.

whiskeystonesWhiskey stones: It’s frustrating, to say the least, when good whisky is diluted by the ice that chills it. Whiskey Stones to the rescue. Handcrafted from Vermont soapstone, this set of nine, properly chilled for four hours in a freezer, offers the right temperature and the right consistency for the holy water. $19.99.

New York in a Bag: A charming set of building blocks fashioned to resemble such architectural New York city icons as the Chrysler Building, the Guggenheim and MoMA’s original 1939 structure. From the MoMA store at $19.99.

Cocktail coupes: Exploring Westchester County’s Rivertowns — Ossining, Sleepy Hollow, Tarrytown, Irvington, Dobbs Ferry — this summer, we happened upon a very nice rummage sale at the Presbyterian Church in Dobbs Ferry. Lots of take could have been had, but we settled on a nice little set of vintage coupe glasses. For $2, they were a bargain. You can shell out a bit more at CB2 for adequate stand-ins. $5.95 each.

Olivewood cheese server: There’s no denying it. Ed and Mrs. F. have yet to find a piece of artisanal cheese they couldn’t palate. They often enjoy their curd on this olivewood cheese server from Williams-Sonoma, a gift from Mrs. F.’s grandmother. $59.

Cast iron grill: While we love Weber’s Smokey Joe, it pales in comparison to this hearty cast-iron offering from Lodge Cast Iron Cookware. Made with pride in the great southern state of Tennessee. $139.95.

Stanley Thermos: For the early morning call when you’re hitting the trail, the slopes or the road, keep your caffeinated fuel warm with this Stanley thermos, an undeniable American classic. My grandfather used one and so, too, should you. $48 from Urban Outfitters.

Books and stationery
Colonel Roosevelt“Colonel Roosevelt”: Edmund Morris’ third volume in his epic biography of Theodore Roosevelt. It’s worth re-reading “The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt,” (1979) and “Theodore Rex,” (2001) in anticipation. Morris looks at the last chapters of the 26th president of the United States. From $19.25 at Amazon.com.

“40: A Doonesbury Retrospective”: It wouldn’t be an ejforbes.com gift list with out a coffee-table book. Take home this one for the reader in your life. A 40-year retrospective of Doonesbury, the iconic strip by Saranac Lake’s own Garry Trudeau. From $59 at Amazon.com.

“Coming home to Glory”: David Eisenhower’s memoir of life with his father Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th president of the United States. A must for every baby-boomer father. From $18.48 from Amazon.com.

Moleskine notebooks: For writing, for jotting, for doodling. Can’t get enough of these tough little buggers. Made in Italy. $9.95 for a set of three from the MoMA store.

LIVES | Elaine Kaufman, Old New York institution, 1929-2010

ElaineRobin Leach and Elaine Kaufman, 1980s. Image courtesy of the LIFE archive.

Last night, the place to be was Elaine’s.

My in-laws were in town and they were good sports — they agreed to wander down to the famous Upper East Side watering hole after a late, light supper. We were among the hundreds who descended on the place to mourn Elaine Kaufman, who died yesterday at 81.

Born in the Bronx in 1929 and raised in Queens and Washington Heights, Kaufman opened her restaurant in 1963. The former Austro-Hungarian restaurant became the salon and clubhouse of the city’s media and literary elites. John Lindsay, Jackie Kennedy, Woody Allen, George Plimpton, Bill Buckley, Gay Talese and scores of other Old New York players were all regulars.

PostToday’s New York Post.

Predictably, the city’s media are in a dither about Elaine’s passing. This morning’s Post is chock full of tribute coverage, though that’s hardly a surprise as editor Col Allan is a regular. New York magazine has a piece online — and the Times is on the case as well.

Another Old New York institution we’ll never forget.

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